Saturday, October 13, 2018

MAGICAL SINTRA, PORTUGAL


Portugal without doubt has its share of quaint towns and villages, but Sintra in my opinion is undeniably one of the most unique and picturesque. Sintra is widely considered to be one of the most beautiful cities in the country and for good reason. Sintra is home to a number of castles, palaces, and historical fortifications nestled atop the Sintra Mountains representing the best of Moorish design, Romanticist architecture, and Neo-Islamic styles. And with its  lovely mountains, misty forests, and exotic gardens Sintra is like a place created by the gods.


Sintra sprawls around the lower end of the Sintra Mountains (Serra de Sintra), a small mountain range in western Portugal. Sintra with its beautiful and historic village has been designated a UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE SITE.  


And if that wasn’t enough, It was also necessary to create a special category for the purpose of CULTURAL LANDSCAPE taking into account Sintra’s natural riches as well as the historic buildings in the town and mountains. Endowed with luxuriant vegetation, the mountains are part of the Sintra-Cascais Natural Park.  

Referred to as a storybook and fairy tale town, Sintra is a treasure trove of fascinating, mysterious, and enchanting sights which all add to its reputation as Portugal’s town of Romanticism. Filled with palaces and manor estates that were once inhabited by Portugal’s royalty and aristocracy, it is a feast for the eyes and an exciting destination to explore.



Sintra once served as the residence for many of Portugal’s royalty and aristocrats and it is not difficult to understand why.  From early times Sintra was the the place of choice for the settlement of various peoples who have passed through the Iberian Peninsula and left traces of their presence many of which are now displayed at the Archaeological Museum of Odrinhas in the outskirts of the town.


In the 19th century Sintra became the first center of European Romantic architecture. Ferdinand II turned a ruined monastery into a castle where this new sensitivity was displayed in the use of Gothic, Egyptian, Moorish and Renaissance elements and in the creation of a park including local and exotic species of trees. Other fine dwellings, built along the same lines in the surrounding Serra (Sierra) created a unique combination of parks and gardens which influenced the development of landscape architecture throughout Europe.  



Sintra definitely captivated me during our stay and I was enthralled with its natural beauty and the fantastic palaces and historical sites. I would not hesitate to return to Sintra for more exploring and until then, I look forward to sharing Sintra in this blog posting. Here are a few examples of why Sintra seems to be straight out of a story book and why I found it so alluring:  

THE PALACE OF SINTRA



The Palace of Sintra (also referred to as the Town Palace) is the oldest palace in Sintra and there is no royal medieval residence in a better state of preservation in Portugal. Royalty lived here off and on from the 1400’s to the 1700’s and each successive occupant added a bit of their own personality. King Manuel I of Portugal was responsible for a lot of the interior decoration covering the walls with eye-catching ceramic tiles from Seville, Spain.


The Palace of Sintra in Portugal has been inhabited more or less continuously from the early 15th century to the late 19th century.  The palace has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site and also a Culture Landscape Site.

The interior of the Palace of Sintra does not disappoint in its opulence and detail.

THE PALACE OF REGALEIRA


The 20th century Quinta da Regaleira (the Palace of Regaleira) is a Gothic architectural masterpiece that served as the private residence to many owners including the Viscountess of Regaleira (a merchant family from northern Portugal). The Regaleira Palace bears the same name as the entire estate which includes amazing gardens. The Palace of Regaleira is classified as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO within the "Cultural Landscape of Sintra."  



In 1892 the Palace of Regaleira was sold to António Augusto Carvalho Monteiro, a wealthy Portuguese emigrant from Brazil, who added his own personal touch reflecting his fascination with the Masons, the Knights Templar, and Divination. The structure's facade is characterized by exuberant Gothic pinnacles, gargoyles, capitals, and an impressive octagonal tower. Underground there’s a system of tunnels, grottoes, and deep shafts leading down to a sanctum for tarot ceremonies.  Sr. Carvalho appears to have been one interesting and unique dude!

Opulence was the name of the game and the Palace of Regaleira reflects that in spades.


And, of course, one must have their own private chapel if you are the owner of a palace!  


I found he images of previous kings in one of the halls of the Palace of Regaleira especially unique.

CASTLE OF THE MORROS



Perched on one of Sintra’s northernmost peaks are the ruins of the Castle of the Moors, a mighty medieval castle built by the Moors in the 8th and 9th centuries. The castle was constructed as a military outpost on top of a mountainous cliff where it has a spectacular panoramic view of the municipality of Sintra. It was then later enlarged by the Christians after their reconquest of the Iberian peninsula in 1147. The castle consists of a double line of military walls which meander over the granite terrain of the promontory.



The walls have four square towers and snake with the contours of the mountain at the top of a sheer cliff.  The views from the castle over the peaks, bluffs and rocky spurs, out to the Atlantic and over to Sintra are absolutely stunning.  Its place on the hilltop, surrounded by and including the natural and exotic vegetation, accentuates the romantic character of the place. The Castle of the Moors is classified as a National Monument, part of the Sintra Cultural Landscape, and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.  The Castle of the Moors was definitely my favorite of the many wonderful sites in Sintra.


Exploring the Castle of the Moors was definitely my idea of a wonderful time!  

PENA PALACE




Designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in the 1990’s, Pena Palace was built at the order of King Ferdinand II in 1838 on the lofty ruins of an old monastery. It was built as a summer residence and has amazing stucco work and trompe l’oeil painting inside with views that are incredible. The ostentatious architecture and elevated setting is similar to the Neuschwanstein Castle in Bavaria, but Pena Palace is actually a couple of decades older. As was the fashion at the time, the palace combines many historical styles from Moorish to Renaissance.



Located in the Sintra hills, the Palace of Pena and Park are the fruit of King Ferdinand II’s creative genius and the greatest expression of 19th century romanticism in Portugal which definitely reflects clear influences from the Manueline and Moorish styles of architecture. The palace was built in such a way as to be visible from any point in the park which consists of a forest and luxuriant gardens with over five hundred different species of trees originating from the four corners of the earth.  Wow!

The entry hall of the Pena Palace is certainly stunning with its chandeliers and the knights standing guard!

Image result
A nice little cozy space at the Pena Palace for some quiet time with no television!

CITY HALL OF SINTRA


Although not a castle or a palace I believe the City Hall of Sintra deserves recognition in its own right since I found it a beautiful structure.

The blue steeple of the City of Hall of Sintra I find especially lovely and appealing.

I loved Sintra with its natural beauty, culture, and people. The following link will magically take you to my photograph album of Sintra which includes captions. Until next time, enjoy your travels wherever they may take you and I look forward to seeing you again in the near future.  Laura

LINK TO SINTRA PHOTO ALBUM



                         
And in closing some wonderful words to live by from Sintra:

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Saturday, September 22, 2018

PUERTO VALLARTA: FUN IN THE SUMMER SUN




Little did we know that when we moved to Puerto Vallarta twenty-three years ago that it would eventually become our permanent home. We experienced many years of wandering, exploring, and living in the amazing world of Latin America and I loved it all. In 2014 we decided it was t time to settle down and we chose Puerto Vallarta because of many factors. Primary of which was the quiet lifestyle we were able to create and the great outdoor water opportunities it provided.


Summer time fun with fish, pelicans, and iguanas.  What more could you want!

It's that time of the year when it's hot, hot, hot.  My husband and I love it since it also the quiet time of the year in Puerto Vallarta where we have much of what we enjoy to ourselves.  The days start slowly with our checking out the ocean swimming and snorkeling condition, then the sky and sun condition to determine the strength of sunblock required as recommended by our dermatologist daughter, and then deciding what's for breakfast. Some people might think this routine becomes boring.  But in fact there is always something to entertain and possibly amaze us once we enter the aquatic world of the great blue sea.



I believe the local puffer fish are starting to recognize my husband and are learning to put up with his unsolicited attention.


A simply GORGEOUS parrot fish which is not all that common to see, but when you do you will be impressed!

Since it's hot, hot, hot we spend a lot of time in the water to keep cool and visit our fish friends. My husband is the underwater photographer, but he does share his camera on occasion when I try to catch him in a diving moment. My official job is to be his spotter and this relationship seems to be to the liking of our fish friends.


 A blue spotted puffer fish mingling with a giant blue damsel fish.   Aren't they a handsome couple!


Taking "selfies" with the ocean current and waves can be a challenge, but I think we are getting the hang of it.


Sharing the ocean with a tortuga always gets me very excited! 


Catching and releasing a puffer fish also makes my day!


Swimming with an octopus is not an every day occurrence, but I'm certainly happy my husband caught this one on the camera.


Finding a lovely star fish like this is one of the rewards of snorkeling, but I quickly placed him back in his "hidey-hole" to continue his underwater life. 



A very rare yellow puffer fish who kindly let me hold him for a very brief "hello."


This summer time blog posting shares the underworld sea world we love exploring and also the varied and fascinating local animal life which includes the pelicans and iguanas.  I hope you enjoy this visual summer blog posting with the following large photograph albums which include videos.


FUN IN THE SUMMER SUN PHOTOGRAPH ALBUM


SUMMER FISH, PELICAN, AND IGUANA FUN 


And in closing if I haven't already overdone it, the following links will magically take to you to my previous postings on the iguanas and pelicans of Puerto Vallarta for those who want to learn more about these fascinating creatures.

A FASCINATION WITH PELICANS

IGUANA TIME IN PUERTO VALLARTA



Until next time, keep your summer cool and wishing you wonderful travels wherever they may take you. And my friendly reminder:  Memories are only a click away even under water!
























Thursday, August 16, 2018

ANTHONY BOURDAIN: TRAVEL AND HIS WORDS OF WISDOM


Anthony and our daughter briefly crossed paths and he graciously posed for this lovely photograph.

In tribute and sorrow I create this blog post in honor and memory of Anthony Bourdain.

I have had a fascination and curiosity about Anthony Bourdain for many, many years.  I know this might sound too personal and possibly inappropriate for a MEXICO AND BEYOND:  LAURA'S PHOTO JOURNEY blog posting. However, his passion for travel and food resonated with me and consequently I writing  this posting in his memory.




Since his death I often think of Anthony Bourdain, not only with a heavy heart, but also with a smile on my face.  My husband and I "met" Tony during our "nomadic life" while living in and exploring Latin America including Mexico, Central, and South America. Those were the days before the web, the Internet, casting, et cetera, et cetera, but we did make Anthony's acquaintance when we had occasional access to television. When we returned many years later and settled down to live full time in Mexico, Anthony Bourdain still kept us company.



I would like to celebrate Mr. Bourdain's life with some of the highlights of his professional life and some of his wonderful travel quotes which I still take to heart whenever we travel. 

Anthony Michael Bourdain (June 25, 1956 - June 8, 2018) was an American celebrity chef, author, travel "documentarian," and television personality who starred in programs focusing on the exploration of international culture, cuisine, and the human condition. He was considered one of the most influential chefs in the world.




Mr. Bourdain was a 1978 graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and a veteran of a number of professional kitchens in his long career which included many years spent as executive chef at Brasserie Les Halles in Manhattan.

Mr. Bourdain became known for his bestselling book Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly (2000). His first food and world-travel television show, A Cook's Tour, ran for 35 episodes on the Food Network in 2002 and 2003.




In 2005, he began hosting the Travel Channel's culinary and cultural adventure programs Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (2005–2012) and The Layover (2011–2013). In 2013, he began a three-season run as a judge on The Taste, and concurrently switched his travelogue programming to CNN to host Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown.




Mr. Bourdain's death was announced to the world in the following statement: "It is with extraordinary sadness we can confirm the death of our friend and colleague, Anthony Bourdain," CNN said in a statement Friday morning. "His love of great adventure, new friends, fine food and drink and the remarkable stories of the world made him a unique storyteller."  




Mr. Bourdain will be greatly missed, but I hope his unique personality and talent will endure for many generations to come.  The following are travel quotations which I find not only wonderful, but oh-so true.  Thank you, Mr. Bourdain! 


The 13 wisest things Anthony Bourdain said                                 about travel

By: Noelle Alejandra Salmi June 9, 2018 for Matador Network

"We will miss him, but we won’t forget what he has taught us — to travel with open minds and hearts, to travel fearlessly. As we remember Anthony Bourdain, we share with you some of his best pieces of travel wisdom."

On having an open mind

1. “If you’re twenty-two, physically fit, hungry to learn and be better, I urge you to travel — as far and as widely as possible. Sleep on floors if you have to. Find out how other people live and eat and cook. Learn from them — wherever you go.”

2. “Do we really want to travel in hermetically sealed pope mobiles through the rural provinces of France, Mexico and the Far East, eating only in Hard Rock Cafes and McDonald’s? Or do we want to eat without fear, tearing into the local stew, the humble taqueria’s mystery meat, the sincerely offered gift of a lightly grilled fish head? I know what I want. I want it all. I want to try everything once.”

3. “If I’m an advocate for anything, it’s to move. As far as you can, as much as you can. Across the ocean, or simply across the river. The extent to which you can walk in someone else’s shoes or at least eat their food, it’s a plus for everybody. Open your mind, get up off the couch, move.”

On planning
4. “Nothing unexpected and wonderful is going to happen if you have an itinerary in Paris filled with the Louvre and the Eiffel Tower.”

5. “I learned a long time ago that trying to micromanage the perfect vacation is always a disaster. That leads to terrible times.”

6. “I’m a big believer in winging it. I’m a big believer that you’re never going to find perfect city travel experience or the perfect meal without a constant willingness to experience a bad one. Letting the happy accident happen is what a lot of vacation itineraries miss, I think, and I’m always trying to push people to allow those things to happen rather than stick to some rigid itinerary.”
7. “When dealing with complex transportation issues, the best thing to do is pull up with a cold beer and let somebody else figure it out."
On the world

8. “It’s an irritating reality that many places and events defy description. Angkor Wat and Machu Picchu, for instance, seem to demand silence, like a love affair you can never talk about. For a while after, you fumble for words, trying vainly to assemble a private narrative, an explanation, a comfortable way to frame where you’ve been and what’s happened. In the end, you’re just happy you were there — with your eyes open — and lived to see it.”


9. “It seems that the more places I see and experience, the bigger I realize the world to be. The more I become aware of, the more I realize how relatively little I know of it, how many places I still have to go, the more there is to learn. Maybe that’s enlightenment enough; to know that there is no final resting place of the mind; no smug clarity. Perhaps wisdom…is realizing how small I am, and unwise, and how far I have yet to go."


On connecting
10. It’s those little human moments that stick with you forever, the random acts of kindness.”

11. “To be treated well in places where you don’t expect to be treated well, to find things in common with people you thought previously you had very, very little in common with, well that can’t be a bad thing.”



On the journey

12. "As you move through this life and this world you change things slightly, you leave marks behind, however small. And in return, life — and travel — leaves marks on you. Most of the time, those marks — on your body or on your heart — are beautiful. Often, though, they hurt.”

13. “Travel isn’t always pretty. It isn’t always comfortable. Sometimes it hurts, it even breaks your heart. But that’s okay. The journey changes you; it should change you. It leaves marks on your memory, on your consciousness, on your heart, and on your body. You take something with you. Hopefully, you leave something good behind.”


MORE TRAVEL QUOTES FROM ANTHONY BOURDAIN

Source:   https://www.burgerabroad.com/bourdain-quotes/

1.  "Travel is about the gorgeous feeling of teetering in the unknown."
2. "I’m a big believer in winging it. I’m a big believer that you’re never going to find perfect city travel experience or the perfect meal without a constant willingness to experience a bad one. Letting the happy accident happen is what a lot of vacation itineraries miss, I think, and I’m always trying to push people to allow those things to happen rather than stick to some rigid itinerary."

3. "The journey is part of the experience - an expression of the seriousness of one’s intent. One doesn’t take the A train to Mecca."

4. "Do we really want to travel in hermetically sealed pope mobiles through the rural provinces of France, Mexico and the Far East, eating only in Hard Rock Cafes and MacDonald's? ... I know what I want. I want it all. I want to try everything once."

5. "Your body is not a temple, it's an amusement park. Enjoy the ride."

6. "If you’re twenty-two, physically fit, hungry to learn and be better, I urge you to travel - as far and as widely as possible. Sleep on floors if you have to. Find out how other people live and eat and cook. Learn from them - wherever you go."

7. "I think food, culture, people and landscape are all absolutely inseparable."

8.  "It seems that the more places I see and experience, the bigger I realize the world to be. The more I become aware of, the more I realize how relatively little I know of it, how many places I have still to go, how much more there is to learn. Maybe that’s enlightenment enough - to know that there is no final resting place of the mind, no moment of smug clarity. Perhaps wisdom, at least for me, means realizing how small I am, and unwise, and how far I have yet to go."

9. "I learned a long time ago that trying to micromanage the perfect vacation is always a disaster. That leads to terrible times."10. "Without experimentation, a willingness to ask questions and try new things, we shall surely become static, repetitive, and moribund."

11. "As you move through this life and this world you change things slightly, you leave marks behind, however small. And in return, life - and travel - leaves marks on you. Most of the time, those marks - on your body or on your heart - are beautiful. Often, though, they hurt."

12. "When dealing with complex transportation issues, the best thing to do is pull up with a cold beer and let somebody else figure it out."

13.  "Food is everything we are. It's an extension of nationalist feeling, ethnic feeling, your personal history, your province, your region, your tribe, your grandma. It's inseparable from those from the get-go."

14.  "It’s an irritating reality that many places and events defy description. Angkor Wat and Machu Picchu, for instance, seem to demand silence, like a love affair you can never talk about. For a while after, you fumble for words, trying vainly to assemble a private narrative, an explanation, a comfortable way to frame where you’ve been and whats happened. In the end, you’re just happy you were there - with your eyes open - and lived to see it."

15.   "If I'm an advocate for anything, it's to move. As far as you can, as much as you can. Across the ocean, or simply across the river. The extent to which you can walk in someone else's shoes or at least eat their food, it's a plus for everybody. Open your mind, get up off the couch, move."

16.  "There’s something wonderful about drinking in the afternoon. A not-too-cold pint, absolutely alone at the bar - even in this fake-ass Irish pub."

17. "I wanted adventures... I wanted kicks - the kind of melodramatic thrills and chills I’d yearned for since childhood, the kind of adventure I’d found as a little boy in the pages of my Tintin comic books. I wanted to see the world - and I wanted the world to be just like the movies."

18.  "My brain and body and nervous system, they see a plane ride, a long plane trip, as an opportunity to sleep with nothing coming in, nothing to do. I just go offline the minute I'm on the plane."

19.   "Travel isn’t always pretty. It isn’t always comfortable. Sometimes it hurts, it even breaks your heart. But that’s okay. The journey changes you; it should change you. It leaves marks on your memory, on your consciousness, on your heart, and on your body. You take something with you. Hopefully, you leave something good behind."

20.   "I often use the hypothetical out-of-control ice-cream truck. What would happen if you were walking across the street and were suddenly hit by a careening Mister Softee truck? As you lie there, in your last few moments of consciousness, what kind of final regrets flash through your mind? ‘I should have had a last cigarette!’ might be one. Or, ‘I should have dropped acid with everybody else back in ’74!’ Maybe ‘I should have done that hostess after all!’ Something along the lines of ‘I should have had more fun in my life! I should have relaxed a little more, enjoyed myself a little more’ That was never my problem. When they’re yanking a fender out of my chest cavity, I will decidedly not be regretting missed opportunities for a good time. My regrets will be more along the lines of a sad list of people hurt, people let down, assets wasted and advantages squandered."



Thank you, Anthony Bourdain, for sharing your life and wisdom with us.  You were one of a kind and will be greatly missed.  Further tributes which I find especially touching:





“Anthony was my best friend. An exceptional human being, so inspiring & generous. One of the great storytellers who connected with so many. I pray he is at peace from the bottom of my heart. My love & prayers are also with his family, friends and loved ones.” Eric Ripert fellow professional chef and friend

















  • Saturday, August 4, 2018

    SEDUCTIVE SEVILLE, SPAIN: AN INTRODUCTION



    Welcome to "Seductive Seville, Spain." When I looked up the word seductive I was given the following definitions which included the following: attractive, captivating, charming, enticing, fascinating, inviting, irresistible, provocative, and tempting. I think Seville is all that and more.

    A VIDEO FROM SEVILLE, SPAIN  with a little music to get you in the mood.

    When I also asked my husband for suggestions describing the Sevillanos, the residents of Seville, and the city of Seville itself, he came up with the following and I couldn't agree more.
    • Handsome and friendly people
    • Vibrant and stylish in a cool chic manner
    • Gregarious and social
    • Timeless and romantic neighborhoods

    If this image doesn't say "Seductive Spain" I'm missing something!

    Seville is the perfect blend of history, culture, and romance and I loved it all. I was fascinated by the gregarious social lifestyle of the Sevillanos (residents of Seville). And to make it completely wonderful, Seville's cathedrals, castles, and historical remains and monuments are fabulous.


    The social life of the residents of Seville is relaxed, fun, and addictive.  All generations are included and they definitely know how to enjoy life to the fullest.


    Seville with its vibrant colors is truly wonderful and compliments its out-going lifestyle perfectly.

    The gorgeous Andalusian capital of Seville is Spain’s most colorful city. From the many-hued facades of buildings in its old quarters to the colorful celebrations of Spring, Seville is a city defined by bold blues, yellows, reds, and oranges. We were fortunate to visit Seville twice during our recent to trip to Portugal and Spain since it was on our route both leaving and returning to Portugal. How absolutely fortunate was that!


    The Gardens of the Alcázar Palace/Castle are gorgeous and perfect for wandering. 

    Seville (spelled Sevilla in Spanish) is the capital and largest city of the Andalusia (Andalucía in Spanish) region of Spain which is an area of hills, rivers, and farmlands which boarders Spain's southern coast. The Seville harbor is located approximately 50 miles from the Atlantic Ocean making it the only river port in Spain. Seville is also the hottest major metropolitan area in the Western Europe geographical area with temperatures reaching above 95 degrees Fahrenheit in the summers.  I would definitely choose to visit Seville in the Spring!  


    The Almeda (Plaza) of Hercules is the social hub of Seville where all generations mix and mingle. The Roman columns are topped with statues of Hercules and Julius Cesar.

    Seville was under Moorish rule from the eighth to fifteen centuries, a legacy which is evident in its architecture including the Alcázar Castle in Seville which is one of three UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE SITES found in Seville. The other two are the Seville Cathedral and the General Archive of the Indies.


    The Seville Cathedral can take your breath away irregardless of the vantage point.  And yes, that is a "flying buttress."

    This posting is about the city of Seville, Spain through the eyes of our cameras. The following photographs are some of my favorites and I hope they entice you as much as "Seductive Seville" did us.  I definitely hope to re-visit Seville to experience more of this great city. Until then, I am excited to share some of our favorite photographs of Seville. After all, images are what "Mexico and Beyond: Laura's Photo Journey" is all about!


    Children at play at the historical Plaza of Hercules where being gregarious begins early in life.


    The Cathedral of Saint Mary of the See, better known as the Seville Cathedral, is the largest Cathedral in the world. It opened in 1528 and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Constructed in the Gothic architectural style with interior arches which I think are stunning!


    From Cathedrals to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards "serenading" Seductive Seville.  Now that's a fairly large leap!



    Since Seville is a city of apartment dwellers and it feels as though the majority of the population eats out and socializes. Sounds great to me.



    We were in Seville during the beginning of Semana (Holy week) and it was truly fascinating to witness the traditions on the streets.
    Another view of the iconic Cathedral of Seville, Spain. I keep wondering how they built these amazing structions without modern engineering!  












    Another of my very favorite photo images during Semana Santa (Holy Week) celebrations. Isn't he gorgeous! 











    The Basilica of Macarena is unbelivable, awesome, and gorgeous. What adjectives have I left out?


    I think I might have developed a slight "crush" on the motos of Seville!  Is that possible?


    If you notice closely there are even flamenco dresses and accessories for the youngest in Seville, Spain.  


    We happened upon a photo shoot in Seville and what an amazing flamenco dress. And she wasn't too bad either!  


    Strolling and getting lost in the alleys of Seville was a favorite past time and I loved it! 



    This public address statement around town and at the bus stops I think is great.  Translation:  "The length of my skirt does NOT say I have said yes."


    The Giralda (bell tower of the Cathedral of Seville) is without a doubt one of my favorite photos taken in Seville among our many.  


    Seville is world reknown for its cured parma ham and I have no argument there. Check out the wall "decor" also.  


    Thank you joining me in Seville, Spain.  And please don't forget my motto:  Memories are only a click away! 

    SEDUCTIVE SEVILLE PHOTO ALBUM

    I loved Seville, Spain, it's lifestyle, culture, and people.  Until next time, the following
    link will magically take you to my extra large photograph album from Seville which includes detailed captions. Until next time, enjoy your travels and wanderings wherever they may take you!  Laura